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Harun Farocki

04 - 19 Jul 2015

Harun Farocki: Nicht löschbares Feuer, 1969. Übertragung des Films in eine Ausstellung, 2015
HARUN FAROCKI
Nicht löschbares Feuer, 1969
Fikret Atay + Harun Farocki + Manuela García + Moritz Liewerscheidt + Haroon Mirza + Ciprian Mureşean + Agnieszka Polska + Silke Schönfeld + Santiago Sierra + Stefanos Tsivopoulos
4 - 19 July 2015

The starting point of the exhibition is the work "Inextinguishable Fire" by Harun Farocki, produced in 1969. Farocki’s film starts as a critique of the Vietnam War and the use of napalm but delves into questions surrounding the responsibility of individuals. Whether as a worker, student or engineer, everyone is part of an economic and social system. The film constantly challenges the audience to reflect their role and the impacts of their own actions. Additionally it questions the audience’s relationships; who benefits and who is harmed? The basic idea of the exhibition is to put Farocki’s socio-political topics in the context of contemporary works. How do artists today deal with the relationships between the individual and society and the consideration of the individual within a system? Which political and social events are important? And especially: How is it possible to translate a film into an exhibition? "Harun Farocki: Inextinguishable Fire, 1969. Translation of the Film Into an Exhibiton" is an exhibition project in the framework of the current seminar "Curatorial Practice: Making An Exhibition", Department of Art History, University of Cologne, led by Regina Barunke. Curated by Dana Bergmann, Carla Bohn, Siri Effelsberg, Katharina Güldner, Stefanie Höser, Nathalie Ladermann, Manuela Mehrwald, Isabel Meyer, Charlotte Pletz, Nicole Trzeja and Lisa Warring, in cooperation with the Temporary Gallery and Gallery On the Move. The idea of the project was developed in collaboration with Sonja Hempel.
 

Tags: Fikret Atay, Harun Farocki, Isabel, Haroon Mirza, Agnieszka Polska, Santiago Sierra, Stefanos Tsivopoulos